Friday, August 20, 2010

Bigot

What kind of un-American, closed-minded bigot would write something like this:


In the seventh century of the Christian era, a wandering Arab of the lineage of Hagar (mohammed), the Egyptian, combining the powers of transcendent genius, with the preternatural energy of a fanatic, and the fraudulent spirit of an impostor, proclaimed himself as a messenger from Heaven, and spread desolation and delusion over an extensive portion of the earth. Adopting from the sublime conception of the Mosaic law, the doctrine of one omnipotent god; he connected indissolubly with it, the audacious falsehood, that he was himself his prophet and apostle. Adopting from the new Revelation of Jesus, the faith and hope of immortal life, and of future retribution, he humbled it to the dust by adapting all the rewards and sanctions of his religion to the gratification of the sexual passion. He poisoned the sources of human felicity at the fountain, by degrading the condition of the female sex, and the allowance of polygamy; and he declared undistinguishing and exterminating war, as a part of his religion, against all the rest of mankind. THE ESSENCE OF HIS DOCTRINE WAS VIOLENCE AND LUST: TO EXALT THE BRUTAL OVER THE SPIRITUAL PART OF HUMAN NATURE…Between these two religions, thus contrasted in their characters, a war of twelve hundred years has already raged. The war is yet flagrant…While the merciless and dissolute dogmas of the false prophet shall furnish motives to human action, there can never be peace upon the earth, and good will towards men.

Clearly no appreciator of human dignity, individual rights, or tolerance, right? 

Or could it be that the author wrote in a time when different values pertained, and these words are simply a reflection of those times?  If so, then shouldn't we be expected to exercise some tolerance?  If the author, one John Quincy Adams, lived, wrote, and served in a time when truth was seen as a greater virtue than tolerance, can we really hold that against him?

(Hat tip to my friend Bob Belvedere at The Camp of the Saints.  Click on the title of this blog to visit his site.)

5 comments:

Keith Miller said...

Being a product of public education, I've never seen this before (surprise, surprise, I know.) That said, I'm not surprised that John Quincy Adams would have voiced such a pointed and politically incorrect, albeit accurate, view of Islam. Much has been made about Jefferson owning a Koran (lauding his apparent tolerance), but it is almost never explained that he read it in order to better understand America's foes plotting piracy from the shores of Tripoli. Your statement at the end about a time that valued truth above tolerance is poetry to my ears. As much as I like the phrase, I would argue that we do not live in a time of tolerance either since it only seems to be a virtue when extended to the left. We live in a time of great evil, and the truth Adams spoke is like a bright ray of piercing light in the darkness. Thanks for sharing.

Steven Givler said...

Thanks Keith; it's always great to hear from you.

Bob Belvedere said...

Thank you for the linkage.

Ah, for the days when truth was a greater virtue than tolerance. You can still find such clear understanding, though, at places like this blog. And for that I am thankful.

John said...

John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Thomas Jefferson - all had quite succinct thoughts about "Mohammedans" as they were known then. The idea that Jefferson hosted an iftar is ludicrous and is not borne out by history. Hitchens' piece in Slate from 2007 gives a clear view of Jefferson's issues with the Barbary Pirates and their justification for banditry.
http://www.slate.com/id/2157314/

John said...

John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Thomas Jefferson - all had quite succinct thoughts about "Mohammedans" as they were known then. The idea that Jefferson hosted an iftar is ludicrous and is not borne out by history. Hitchens' piece in Slate from 2007 gives a clear view of Jefferson's issues with the Barbary Pirates and their justification for banditry.
http://www.slate.com/id/2157314/